Because it’s Friday: “Swim Wild” the The Wild Swimming Brothers

A beautiful short documentary film about three brothers from the north of England who have made their name as wild swimming adventurers.

One of the themes of this film is the impact of wild swimming on mental health which is one of the reasons that I love to be in the open water.

3 brothers, who have come to be known as The Wild Swimming Brothers, have felt the pressures that many people experience while living and working in a city. Feeling the toll that urban living was taking on them, they decided to begin an aquatic journey that has propelled them extremely far from city walls.

The Wild Swimming Brothers

Because it’s Friday: “The Master of Paper Props” by Great Big Story

There’s someone who’s job is to create paper props for films and television. People have fascinating jobs and take intriguing journeys to get into those occupations. This is one of those stories:

Because it’s Friday: “Happiness” by Steve Cutts

Sometimes I pick something on a Friday because it is light and funny, other weeks it’s because it’s beautiful, at other time…well, I pick something because it appeals to me in a different way. This is one of those weeks (for those of you needing one more clue – the title of the video is ironic):

Because it’s Friday: “The Most Unsatisfying Video in the World ever made”

This video has been viewed nearly 6 million time – not bad for something “unsatisfying”.

I’d be interested to know how you respond to it. It made me laugh, but I suspect for some of you the reaction will be very different. Just remember, whatever your reaction it’s likely that millions of other people had a similar reaction:

Because it’s Friday: “A visual history of human knowledge” by Manuel Lima

This TED talk looks at the different metaphors that we use to visualise  knowledge.

According to Lima, we used to map knowledge as trees with trunks and branches, but increasingly we are moving towards using the network as the metaphor with many-to-many connections.

Sometimes things are obvious when they are pointed out, and this is one of them. Whilst I love mind-maps, which tend to follow a tree structure, they are so often inadequate for visualising the multitude of connections that exist: