I’m reading… My Morning Routine

My Morning Routine is a site that asks people about their morning routine, as simple as that, but I really like the insights.

Some of my fascination with this site is pure nosiness, I like to know what other people get up to, there, I’ve said it.

The major part of my fascination comes from experiences in my own life where I’ve let my morning routine get in a mess, once I was in a mess I realised how important routine was, especially in a morning. Since then I’ve tried to drive a set routine for most mornings and that’s really helped.

There are a couple of other aspects of the site that I like. Firstly, most of the insights are from women, My Morning Routine is not a site dominated by middle-aged white men. Even though I am a middle-aged white man even I can have too much of them. Secondly, many of the people would only be recognised in their own field, they’re not universally famous, or even recognised, they’re not ordinary, but they aren’t celebrities either.

I thought about writing my own version of one of the My Morning Routine posts, but instead decided to highlight some of the intriguing answers that people give to the standard questions:

David Kadavy

I am not a morning person. This is exactly why first thing in the morning is my most critical creative time. Research shows that your off-peak times are the best for insightful thinking, so my one goal in the morning is to make the most of that still-slightly-groggy time.

Arianna Huffington

Yes, I treat my transition to sleep as a sacrosanct ritual.

First, I turn off all my electronic devices and gently escort them out of my bedroom. Then, I take a hot bath with epsom salts and a candle flickering nearby; a bath that I prolong if I’m feeling anxious or worried about something. I don’t sleep in my workout clothes as I used to (think of the mixed message that sends to our brains) but have pajamas, nightdresses, and even T-shirts dedicated to sleep. Sometimes I have a cup of chamomile or lavender tea if I want something warm and comforting before going to bed. I love reading real, physical books, especially poetry, novels, and books that have nothing to do with work.

Mike Vardy

I am a night owl, so my bedtime is usually around 1:00am these days.

I have a specific evening routine I carry out as well so to help me wind down my day and start the next one with a sense of direction; part of my evening routine is writing down My 3 Absolutes for the next day.

Erin Loechner

I start my morning with a simple prayer: Lord, help me see. That’s it. Nothing fancy. I find it offers me the precise amount of perspective I need throughout the day – I’m always repeating it in my head!

The statistics page is interesting, 30% of the people are 6am risers with 30% of them in bed for 10pm. 30% of them have had their current routine for more than 3 years. 60% of them check their phones immediately.

I’m reading…Tom Peters

Tom Peters is a writer on business management practices, I suppose you could call him a motivational speaker but that term has become so clichéd I’m not sure you would understand what I meant by it.

Tom is very active on twitter, he’s written over 60,000 tweets:

But the thing I love about Tom are his PowerPoint presentation decks. They are the most remarkable things. He publishes the slides that he uses at events and has also compiled a master copy called The Works while has over 50,000 words in it. A recent one from December 2016 comes to over 108 slides and obliterate many of the design rules that our modern corporate slides abide by, but the contents are thought proving and challenging:


be-the-best


design-rules


women


whoever-tries-and


At the beginning of this post I said that Tom was a motivational speaker, but I also said that you may misinterpret what I meant by that, this is what I mean: I love to read through Tom slide decks because they motivate me. They motivate me to be a better leader. They motivate me to see that things can be better. They motivate me to keep trying new things. They motivate me to keep seeing new things. They motivate me to adjust my priorities.

Every time I sit in a dull, pointless meeting Tom’s words about meetings ring around my head and make me determined that we are going to do better next time:

Prepare for a meeting/every meeting as if your professional life and legacy depended on it. It does.

Most of Tom’s material is highlighted through his blog which I subscribe to via Feedly to make sure I don’t miss out. His most recent post on collected quotes has some gems in it.

I’ll leave the closing thoughts to Tom himself:

I'm reading…Steve Denning

Steve Denning’s bio on Forbes, where he writes, says:

I write about radical management, leadership, innovation & narrative.

I consult with organizations around the world on leadership, innovation, management and business narrative. For many years I worked at the World Bank, where I held many management positions, including director of knowledge management (1996-2000). I am currently a director of the Scrum Alliance, an Amazon Affiliate and a fellow of the Lean Software Society. I am the author of the Leader’s Guide to Radical Management, The Leader’s Guide to Storytelling and The Secret Language of Leadership.

I really enjoy most of what Steve writes, but there are two areas where I especially appreciate his thought provoking articles:

The World’s Dumbest Idea

The title of these posts come from a quote by Jack Welsh in which he refers to the idea of maximising shareholder value as “the world’s dumbest idea”.

The original quote come from the FT in which Welch says:

“On the face of it, shareholder value is the dumbest idea in the world,” he said. “Shareholder value is a result, not a strategy … Your main constituencies are your employees, your customers and your products.”

So why is it such a dumb idea? To radically over-simplify Denning’s writing the answer is that is reduces innovation and ultimately reduces the value of an organisation by bleeding it dry. An example of where this occurs is share buybacks:

The resources spent on share buybacks are resources that could otherwise be spent by the organization on innovation or compensating workers for their gains in productivity.

What’s the alternative? That’s summarised by another quote from Peter Drucker:

“There is only one valid definition of a business purpose: to create a customer.”

I’ll leave you to read if your interested.

Some posts:

Agile

I work in IT and the Agile movement has had a massive impact on the way that we now work.

We used to work on massive projects that regularly resulted in failure. These projects were managed through waterfall plans that were regularly late and over budget. We needed a different way of working and in 2001 a group got together in Snowbird, Utah. The result of this gathering was the Manifesto of Agile Development and the ignition of a massive change across the industry that it still, in many ways, in its infancy.

Denning isn’t a software developer, he approaches Agile, as a mindset, from the perspective of leadership and management. In 2012 he called Agile “the best-kept management secret on the planet”.

The following video is the best summary that I’ve seen, it even starts with a summary of the talk itself:

Some posts:

New Series – "I'm reading…"

I’ve thought that I need a new series to give my writing some structure but couldn’t decide on what it should be. Series are a great way of creating a rhythm to writing, they also give people something to look forward to (hopefully).

I have toyed with a number of series ideas and finally settled on “I’m Reading…” where I plan to highlight some of the many things that I read. This will focus on people who write longer format blogs and articles that influence the way that I think about things and authors who think through things. Many of these are business and technology focused, but there’s also writing on science, art, sociology and other interesting subjects.

If you’d missed the earlier series and those that are still ongoing here are some links for you:

  • Acronyms – we use them all the time, but what do they mean.
  • Axioms – where I look at things that people take to be true and check whether there is any evidence to support them.
  • Concept of the Day – where we look at a concept the I’ve read about or used.
  • Office Speak – every office has its own language, this is my attempt to explain that language.
  • My Changing Workplace – a bit of history about my working life (I must update this as the last one covered the 2000’s).
  • My Tools – I use all sorts of tools and this is my overview of what they are.
  • The Productive Workplace – a series from 2014 were I looked at the skills that would be required by 2020, which is only 39 months away!

There’s also the My Stories series over on my Blessings site.