Humans and Robot: Google I/O and Self Driving Bin Lorries

It’s Google’s big developer conference this week – I/O. So far centre stage has been given over to Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning.

There are a set of articles that have been published, some of which I’ve highlighted below but I can summarise all of them with this one quote:

“We are now witnessing a new shift in computing: the move from a mobile-first to an AI-first world.”

Sandar Pichai, CEO, Google

For many the shift to mobile has made little impact on their day-to-day work, it’s had far more impact on their personal life. The switch to AI-first will have a massive impact across both our work and personal lives.

The keynote for I/O was just under 2 hours long, but thankfully The Verge have put together a 10 minute video of the highlights:

Also, Volvo have announced that they are working on a system for self driving refuse collection lorries. This is yet another self-driving initiative, but one with a specific purpose in mind. Instead of trying to resolve the generic problem of self-driving vehicles, in all contexts, this project is seeking to enable self-driving in the urban refuse collection context. Historically targeted innovations like this one are adopted prior to more generic innovations like self-driving cars:


Making AI work for everyone via Google

We are now witnessing a new shift in computing: the move from a mobile-first to an AI-first world. And as before, it is forcing us to reimagine our products for a world that allows a more natural, seamless way of interacting with technology. Think about Google Search: it was built on our ability to understand text in webpages. But now, thanks to advances in deep learning, we’re able to make images, photos and videos useful to people in a way they simply haven’t been before. Your camera can “see”; you can speak to your phone and get answers back—speech and vision are becoming as important to computing as the keyboard or multi-touch screens.


Partnering on machine learning in healthcare via Google

Our researchers at Google have shown over the past year how our machine learning can help clinicians detect breast cancer metastases in lymph nodes and screen for diabetic retinopathy. We’re working with Alphabet’s Verily arm and other biomedical partners to translate these research results into practical medical devices, such as a tool to help prevent blindness in patients with diabetes.

Now we’re ready to do more: machine learning is mature enough to start accurately predicting medical events—such as whether patients will be hospitalized, how long they will stay, and whether their health is deteriorating despite treatment for conditions such as urinary tract infections, pneumonia, or heart failure.


Why Google’s CEO Is Excited About Automating Artificial Intelligence via MIT Technology

Machine-learning experts are in short supply as companies in many industries rush to take advantage of recent strides in the power of artificial intelligence. Google’s CEO says one solution to the skills shortage is to have machine-learning software take over some of the work of creating machine-learning software.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s